Lifestyle

The Viking lifestyle proves popular in Lismore

AXE MAN: Marko Toth, aka "Loki" the Viking, at the Viking Village in Lismore.
AXE MAN: Marko Toth, aka "Loki" the Viking, at the Viking Village in Lismore. Mireille Merlet

LEARNING the arts of the "olden times" was a childhood dream for Gold Coast Viking warrior Marko Toth, but he had to wait until the age of 21 to start his Viking journey.

"I was driving to visit my grandma up at Bribie Island when I saw there was a big Viking show on at Caboolture," Mr Toth explained.

"I saw that, and said 'sorry Grandma' and spent the rest of the day there," he laughed.

RELATED: Warming hearts on cold night: scenes from the Lantern Parade

He came across a Gold Coast-based warrior group called Jorth Gar, which means "earth spear", and has been training in mediaeval weaponry with them ever since.

"This is my eighth year," he said.

"My favourite style is axes; I've got two large axes, two small axes, and a little hidden dagger. I'm a fully qualified user of all the weapons."

Becoming a fully-fledged member of a Viking "garrison" offers a fulfilling social life too, with members attending regular trainings, gatherings, and mock battles.

A full spectrum of Viking life was on display at the Viking Village in Lismore on Saturday, with the swordplay, archery and armour displays drawing big crowds alongside craft skills such as leather-making, jewellery-making, braiding, tool making and even basic domestic duties.

"Mother of cauldrons" Claire O'Meara's job was to cook for the ravenous clan, including famished re-enactors participating in the Lantern Parade's fiery finale at Oakes Oval.

One of the dishes she spent hours preparing was a mediaeval special of stuffed goose.

"The geese have been stuffed with offal cooked with onions, garlic, apple, breadcrumbs, currants, walnuts, herbs - anything to give it flavour," Ms O'Meara said.

"I've also made a salt dough which is almost 50-50 flour and salt mixed with water.

"I encase the whole bird in the dough and will then make a hole in the coals, place the bird in the coals and cover it up.

"Because of the high ratio of salt, when the heat comes into contact with it, the crust will become rock hard. It will encase the bird and it will cook in its own juices.

"I'll probably cook it for about three or four hours.

"It should be delicious."

Topics:  editors picks, history, lismore lantern festival




Stay Connected

Update your news preferences and get the latest news delivered to your inbox.

What you had to say about the Lismore Super Centre

THE planned Lismore Home & Leisure Centre would include nine large retailers

"It will be a monster fail just like Ballina"

Do not miss Beef Week’s beefed up weekend

Former Mr Beef entrants George Clarke and Nathan Conroy, of England, with previous Mr Beef Teate Jackson (front).

The 'steaks' are high this weekend in Casino

$4 million announced for Ballina airport expansion

North Coast Nationals MLC Ben Franklin and Minister for Regional Development John Barilaro announced the funding at Ballina Byron Gateway Airport this morning.

Airport among 10 projects to receive vital infrastructure upgrades

Latest deals and offers

Barnaby Joyce talks Johnny Depp's dogs in Tweed

Deputy Prime Minister Barnaby Joyce talks about Johnny Depp's dogs Pistol and Boo...

Road rage caught on Dashcam

Attack with a baseball bat caught on Dashcam

Video of a violent road rage incident in Orange last December.

Scam victim shares his story

Lismore scam victim Robert Duffy has bravely spoken out about his experience at the...

Lismore real estate agent celebrates 100th birthday

LJ Hooker Lismore principal Paul Deegan is the third generation to operate the 100-year-old family business.

A Lismore real estate is celebrating 100 years in business.

Coastal development keeps young people on Northern Rivers

Wes Bale is a 27-year-old born and bred Lennox Head local who is an example of the demographic shift in the region.

Young Northern Rivers residents are looking closer to home